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Now showing at Cineworld Cheltenham The Brewery, Oxford Passage, off St Marg,Cheltenham,Gloucestershire GL50 4EF 0871 200 2000

  • Central Intelligence
  • Elvis & Nixon
  • Gods Of Egypt
  • Independence Day: Resurgence
  • Independence Day: Resurgence 3D
  • Independence Day: Resurgence: An IMAX 3D Experience
  • Me Before You
  • Mother's Day
  • Royal Opera Live: Werther
  • The Boss
  • The Conjuring 2
  • The Importance Of Being Earnest: Encore Screening
  • The Nice Guys
  • The Secret Life Of Pets
  • The Secret Life Of Pets 3D
  • Warcraft: The Beginning

Central Intelligence 3 stars

Calvin Joyner is a humble accountant, who married his sweetheart. Their high school reunion beckons and Calvin is reluctant to attend because he doesn't feel he has delivered on the promise of his formative years. Out of the blue, old classmate Robbie Weirdich gets in touch and the two men bond over a couple of drinks. It transpires that Robbie is a CIA agent, who may or may not be in possession of missile launch codes that are poised to be sold to a mysterious buyer.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Comedy
  • CastAaron Paul, Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Amy Ryan, Danielle Nicolet.
  • DirectorRawson Marshall Thurber.
  • WriterDavid Stassen, Ike Barinholtz, Rawson Marshall Thurber.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration108 mins
  • Official sitewww.centralintelligencemovie.co.uk
  • Release01/07/2016

Calvin Joyner (Kevin Hart) was the golden boy of his high school in 1996, winning countless awards for his sporting prowess. In sharp contrast, overweight misfit Robbie Weirdicht (Dwayne Johnson) was bullied mercilessly by classmates and suffered the humiliation of being thrown naked into the gymnasium during the end of term student rally. Twenty years later, Calvin is a humble accountant, who has married his sweetheart, Maggie (Danielle Nicolet). Their high school reunion beckons and Calvin is reluctant to attend because he doesn't feel he has delivered on the promise of his formative years. Out of the blue, Robbie gets in touch with Calvin and the two men bond over a couple of drinks. It transpires that Robbie is a CIA agent, who may or may not be in possession of missile launch codes that are poised to be sold to a mysterious buyer (Thomas Kretschmann). Fellow CIA agent Pamela Harris (Amy Ryan) recruits Calvin because she believes that Robbie has gone rogue and is actually a terrorist known as the Black Badger. Torn between past and present, Calvin must work out if he can trust Robbie or if he is being used as a pawn in a deadly conspiracy.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Elvis & Nixon 3 stars

On December 21, 1970, chart-topping singer Elvis Presley arrives unannounced at the gates of the White House in full regalia with a rambling correspondence for US President Richard Nixon. In the hand-written letter, the singer requests that he be granted the special status of Federal Agent At Large for the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs in order to use his influence to dissuade America's youth from experimenting with illegal substances. Nixon agrees to an audience with the superstar.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Historical/Period, Romance
  • CastMichael Shannon, Colin Hanks, Alex Pettyfer, Johnny Knoxville, Kevin Spacey.
  • DirectorLiza Johnson.
  • WriterHanala Sagal, Joey Sagal, Cary Elwes.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration86 mins
  • Official site
  • Release24/06/2016

On December 21, 1970, chart-topping singer Elvis Presley arrived unannounced at the gates of the White House in full regalia with a rambling correspondence for US President Richard Nixon. In the hand-written letter, the singer requested that he be granted the special status of Federal Agent At Large for the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs in order to use his influence to dissuade America's youth from experimenting with illegal substances and engaging in other counterculture behaviour. There was no such position within the administration, but Nixon agreed to an audience with the musical superstar. This meeting of suspicious minds remained secret for over a year and the US National Archive now receives more requests for copies of the black and white photograph of Nixon and Presley standing side-by-side in the Oval Office than the Constitution of the United States or the Bill of Rights. There are no audio records of the men's conversation. Director Liza Johnson elicits compelling performances from Michael Shannon and Kevin Spacey for her amusing and outlandish dramatisation of this head-on collision of pop royalty and political hubris. Elvis & Nixon evokes the period with bling-laden style and scriptwriters Joey Sagal, Hanala Sagal and Cary Elwes revel in the preposterousness of the brief encounter. The film opens in the plush confines of Graceland where Elvis (Shannon) is horrified by the anarchy he sees unfolding on his television screen. Determined to halt his country's descent into depravity, Elvis compels his good friend Jerry Schilling (Alex Pettyfer) to join him on a madcap odyssey to Washington D.C. Sonny West (Johnny Knoxville), another trusted member of the entourage, joins the party and the trio are granted admission to the White House by Chief of Staff Harry Robbins Haldeman (Tate Donovan). Special advisor Egil Krogh (Colin Hanks) and the President's Deputy Assistant, Dwight Chapin (Evan Peters), carefully stage-manage proceedings with Nixon (Spacey). The President's initial disdain for the singer's letter is evident. "I wrote it on the plane," confesses Elvis. "I could tell," retorts Nixon dryly. This frostiness gradually melts as the President discovers that his jumpsuit-clad visitor empathises about the insidious influence of the media and shares his withering opinion of The Beatles. Elvis & Nixon provides the lead duo with plentiful opportunities for scenery-chewing, not least when the singer first enters the Oval Office and ransacks the President's private supply of soft drinks and candy. Verbal references to events that reverberate today jar, as if they have been shoehorned into dialogue at the last minute, like when Nixon casually remarks, "This whole thing with the Iraqis and the Syrians will go away in a couple of weeks." Shannon and Spacey relish their on-screen verbal duels and they add lustre to a film that might otherwise have been consigned straight to home formats.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Gods Of Egypt 2 stars

King Osiris is poised to crown his son Horus the new king of Egypt but jealous brother Set intervenes, killing the monarch and seizing the throne. He decrees that when mortals die, they will now have to pay with riches in order to pass into the afterlife. Set intends to kill his nephew but Horus' lover Hathor pleads for mercy and the new king rips out the rightful heir's eyes. Mortal thief Bek and his slave girl sweetheart Zaya join forces to overthrow Set by stealing back Horus' peepers.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Drama, Fantasy, Historical/Period
  • CastGerard Butler, Brenton Thwaites, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Chadwick Boseman, Geoffrey Rush, Courtney Eaton, Elodie Yung.
  • DirectorAlex Proyas.
  • WriterMatt Sazama, Burk Sharpless.
  • CountryUS/Austral
  • Duration127 mins
  • Official sitewww.godsofegypt.movie
  • Release17/06/2016

Swords, sandals and silliness are in abundance in Alex Proyas' lumbering fantasy adventure, set in a sprawling ancient Egypt in which shape-shifting gods live side by side with awestruck mortals. According to a laconic voiceover, the deities are easily identifiable because they are taller and have "gold running through their veins". Alas, there is no gold - fool's or otherwise - running through Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless' uneven script, which is heavy on the muscle-flexing and sibling rivalry and light on everything that matters: coherent plotting, characterisation, dramatic momentum or emotional depth. The tone is wildly uneven, careening between bombastic computer-generated spectacle, bickering romance and mismatched buddy comedy. Even the digital trickery can't find its groove. A chariot sequence is hilariously shoddy in its execution, special effects don't gel with live action elements and director Proyas insists on choreographing every bruising fight sequence with swirling camerawork and excessive slow motion. Clash Of The Titans and The Neverending Story are nostalgic reference points and an overblown tomb-raiding sequence nods to Indiana Jones when an acrobatic thief spies creepy crawlies on the floor and deadpans, "Where do you find that many scorpions?" Like so many elements in Proyas' film, they are digitally rendered and unconvincing. Benevolent King Osiris (Bryan Brown) is poised to crown his self-doubting son, Horus (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau), the new ruler of Egypt in front of an adoring throng, including his wife Isis (Rachael Blake) and Horus' lover, Hathor (Elodie Yung), the goddess of love. At the last minute, Osiris' jealous brother Set (Gerard Butler) gate-crashes the ceremony, murders the old king and seizes the throne. "Behold the fate of those who stand in my way!" bellows Set, who demands that gods and mortals bow before him. Horus attempts to avenge his father, but Set is too powerful and rips out his nephew's eyes. Humble pickpocket Bek (Brenton Thwaites) and slave girl sweetheart Zaya (Courtney Eaton) set forth to overthrow Set by stealing back Horus' peepers. The plan goes tragically awry and Bek enters into a dangerous pact with Horus to complete his mission, aided by the rightful king's grandfather, Ra (Geoffrey Rush), who shoots fiery bolts harnessed from the sun from his watchtower in the heavens. Gods Of Egypt is a morass of oiled pecs, male posturing and tiresome showdowns between exiled heroes and otherworldly creatures. Butler chews scenery with a roaring Scottish accent like a man who hasn't eaten for months, while Coster-Waldau and Thwaites are bland and possess no palpable screen chemistry. During one of their awkward verbal jousts, Thwaites questions if his hunky co-star is being funny. "You think I put any effort into trying to amuse you?" responds Coster-Waldau. Gods Of Egypt certainly doesn't muster any effort to entertain us.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Independence Day: Resurgence 2 stars

It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore issued his rallying cry to repel alien invaders. Following the devastating showdown, the United Nations establishes a new early warning program named Earth Space Defense (ESD), which should alert us to future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. We are painfully unaware that the aliens from the initial attack sent a distress signal to the rest of their battalion before their defeat and more powerful aliens are poised to storm the planet.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastBill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, James Vanderbilt, Liam Hemsworth, William Fichtner, Travis Tope.
  • DirectorRoland Emmerich.
  • WriterNicolas Wright, James A Woods, Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration120 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxmovies.com/movies/independence-day-resurgence
  • Release23/06/2016

During the calm before the digital effects storm in Independence Day: Resurgence, Jeff Goldblum's quixotic scientist stares slack-jawed at an approaching alien mothership and gasps, "That's definitely bigger than the last one". Those words encapsulate the bombastic sequel to Roland Emmerich's 1996 sci-fi blockbuster, which famously blew up The White House as a symbol of extra-terrestrial hostility. Second time around, the German director isn't content with razing iconic buildings in Washington D.C. He deposits the whole of Dubai including the spearlike Burj Khalifa skyscraper on top of London, flattening landmarks with whooping abandon, then proceeds to pulverise America's eastern coast. Restraint isn't in the film's limited vocabulary and repeatedly, Emmerich and his army of special effects wizards conjure wanton destruction on a grand scale. With the benefit of this state-of-the-art trickery, eye-popping 3D and immersive sound, Independence Day: Resurgence should be a pulse-quickening thrill ride. So it comes as a crushing disappointment that the second film lacks the roughly hewn excitement and charm of its predecessor. Critically, the five scriptwriters have neglected to provide us with characters to care about before they unleash otherworldly hell upon the third rock from the sun. It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore (Bill Pullman) issued his rallying cry to the entrenched human race. In the aftermath, survivors salvaged the remains of fallen alien technology to create hybrid weapons systems. We also initiated the Earth Space Defense (ESD) under the direction of David Levinson (Goldblum) as an early warning system against future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. On the eve of the July 4 celebrations, a hulking otherworldly destroyer enters our atmosphere in response to a distress call from the fallen fleet. Current US President Elizabeth Lanford (Sela Ward) commands elite pilots to take to the skies, including Dylan Hiller (Jessie Usher), orphaned pals Jake Morrison (Liam Hemsworth) and Charlie Miller (Travis Tope), whose parents perished during the failed first invasion and Chinese golden girl Rain (Angelababy). "It's the fourth of July," bellows Dylan as he spearheads the rebellion, "so show 'em some fireworks!" On the ground, Levinson searches for a scientific miracle aided by Whitmore's plucky daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe), French psychiatrist Dr Catherine Marceaux (Charlotte Gainsbourg), African warlord Dikembe Umbutu (Deobia Oparei) and Area 51 boffin Dr Brakish Okun (Brent Spiner), who suffers from the human-alien residual psychic condition. Independence Day: Resurgence lazily embraces disaster movie cliches including one mawkish subplot involving Levinson's father (Judd Hirsch), a school bus of stricken children and a dog. Performances struggle to make an impact above the din of pyrotechnics and a rumbustious orchestral score. Pivotal characters, who are clearly marked for death, serve their perfunctory purpose, blatantly teeing up a third instalment that will hopefully take another 20 years before it sees the flickering light of a cinema screen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Independence Day: Resurgence 3D 2 stars

It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore issued his rallying cry to repel alien invaders. Following the devastating showdown, the United Nations establishes a new early warning program named Earth Space Defense (ESD), which should alert us to future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. We are painfully unaware that the aliens from the initial attack sent a distress signal to the rest of their battalion before their defeat and more powerful aliens are poised to storm the planet.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastBill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, Liam Hemsworth, William Fichtner, Travis Tope.
  • DirectorRoland Emmerich.
  • WriterNicolas Wright, James Vanderbilt, James A Woods, Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration120 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxmovies.com/movies/independence-day-resurgence
  • Release23/06/2016

During the calm before the digital effects storm in Independence Day: Resurgence, Jeff Goldblum's quixotic scientist stares slack-jawed at an approaching alien mothership and gasps, "That's definitely bigger than the last one". Those words encapsulate the bombastic sequel to Roland Emmerich's 1996 sci-fi blockbuster, which famously blew up The White House as a symbol of extra-terrestrial hostility. Second time around, the German director isn't content with razing iconic buildings in Washington D.C. He deposits the whole of Dubai including the spearlike Burj Khalifa skyscraper on top of London, flattening landmarks with whooping abandon, then proceeds to pulverise America's eastern coast. Restraint isn't in the film's limited vocabulary and repeatedly, Emmerich and his army of special effects wizards conjure wanton destruction on a grand scale. With the benefit of this state-of-the-art trickery, eye-popping 3D and immersive sound, Independence Day: Resurgence should be a pulse-quickening thrill ride. So it comes as a crushing disappointment that the second film lacks the roughly hewn excitement and charm of its predecessor. Critically, the five scriptwriters have neglected to provide us with characters to care about before they unleash otherworldly hell upon the third rock from the sun. It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore (Bill Pullman) issued his rallying cry to the entrenched human race. In the aftermath, survivors salvaged the remains of fallen alien technology to create hybrid weapons systems. We also initiated the Earth Space Defense (ESD) under the direction of David Levinson (Goldblum) as an early warning system against future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. On the eve of the July 4 celebrations, a hulking otherworldly destroyer enters our atmosphere in response to a distress call from the fallen fleet. Current US President Elizabeth Lanford (Sela Ward) commands elite pilots to take to the skies, including Dylan Hiller (Jessie Usher), orphaned pals Jake Morrison (Liam Hemsworth) and Charlie Miller (Travis Tope), whose parents perished during the failed first invasion and Chinese golden girl Rain (Angelababy). "It's the fourth of July," bellows Dylan as he spearheads the rebellion, "so show 'em some fireworks!" On the ground, Levinson searches for a scientific miracle aided by Whitmore's plucky daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe), French psychiatrist Dr Catherine Marceaux (Charlotte Gainsbourg), African warlord Dikembe Umbutu (Deobia Oparei) and Area 51 boffin Dr Brakish Okun (Brent Spiner), who suffers from the human-alien residual psychic condition. Independence Day: Resurgence lazily embraces disaster movie cliches including one mawkish subplot involving Levinson's father (Judd Hirsch), a school bus of stricken children and a dog. Performances struggle to make an impact above the din of pyrotechnics and a rumbustious orchestral score. Pivotal characters, who are clearly marked for death, serve their perfunctory purpose, blatantly teeing up a third instalment that will hopefully take another 20 years before it sees the flickering light of a cinema screen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Independence Day: Resurgence: An IMAX 3D Experience 2 stars

It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore issued his rallying cry to repel alien invaders. Following the devastating showdown, the United Nations establishes a new early warning program named Earth Space Defense (ESD), which should alert us to future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. We are painfully unaware that the aliens from the initial attack sent a distress signal to the rest of their battalion before their defeat and more powerful aliens are poised to storm the planet.

  • GenreAction, Science Fiction, Thriller
  • CastBill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Maika Monroe, Liam Hemsworth, William Fichtner, Travis Tope.
  • DirectorRoland Emmerich.
  • WriterNicolas Wright, James Vanderbilt, James A Woods, Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration120 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxmovies.com/movies/independence-day-resurgence
  • Release23/06/2016

During the calm before the digital effects storm in Independence Day: Resurgence, Jeff Goldblum's quixotic scientist stares slack-jawed at an approaching alien mothership and gasps, "That's definitely bigger than the last one". Those words encapsulate the bombastic sequel to Roland Emmerich's 1996 sci-fi blockbuster, which famously blew up The White House as a symbol of extra-terrestrial hostility. Second time around, the German director isn't content with razing iconic buildings in Washington D.C. He deposits the whole of Dubai including the spearlike Burj Khalifa skyscraper on top of London, flattening landmarks with whooping abandon, then proceeds to pulverise America's eastern coast. Restraint isn't in the film's limited vocabulary and repeatedly, Emmerich and his army of special effects wizards conjure wanton destruction on a grand scale. With the benefit of this state-of-the-art trickery, eye-popping 3D and immersive sound, Independence Day: Resurgence should be a pulse-quickening thrill ride. So it comes as a crushing disappointment that the second film lacks the roughly hewn excitement and charm of its predecessor. Critically, the five scriptwriters have neglected to provide us with characters to care about before they unleash otherworldly hell upon the third rock from the sun. It has been 20 years since US President Thomas J Whitmore (Bill Pullman) issued his rallying cry to the entrenched human race. In the aftermath, survivors salvaged the remains of fallen alien technology to create hybrid weapons systems. We also initiated the Earth Space Defense (ESD) under the direction of David Levinson (Goldblum) as an early warning system against future incursions by hostile extra-terrestrials. On the eve of the July 4 celebrations, a hulking otherworldly destroyer enters our atmosphere in response to a distress call from the fallen fleet. Current US President Elizabeth Lanford (Sela Ward) commands elite pilots to take to the skies, including Dylan Hiller (Jessie Usher), orphaned pals Jake Morrison (Liam Hemsworth) and Charlie Miller (Travis Tope), whose parents perished during the failed first invasion and Chinese golden girl Rain (Angelababy). "It's the fourth of July," bellows Dylan as he spearheads the rebellion, "so show 'em some fireworks!" On the ground, Levinson searches for a scientific miracle aided by Whitmore's plucky daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe), French psychiatrist Dr Catherine Marceaux (Charlotte Gainsbourg), African warlord Dikembe Umbutu (Deobia Oparei) and Area 51 boffin Dr Brakish Okun (Brent Spiner), who suffers from the human-alien residual psychic condition. Independence Day: Resurgence lazily embraces disaster movie cliches including one mawkish subplot involving Levinson's father (Judd Hirsch), a school bus of stricken children and a dog. Performances struggle to make an impact above the din of pyrotechnics and a rumbustious orchestral score. Pivotal characters, who are clearly marked for death, serve their perfunctory purpose, blatantly teeing up a third instalment that will hopefully take another 20 years before it sees the flickering light of a cinema screen.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Me Before You 3 stars

William Traynor is a London playboy who harks from privileged stock. Fate deals him a cruel blow and William is left paralysed. He returns to his ancestral home and relinquishes his lust for life. In order to raise his spirits, Will's parents advertise for a carer and companion for their son and former tea shop waitress Louisa Clark answers the call. She buoys Will's spirits with a series of excursions. Friendship between the pair threatens to blossom into romance but Louisa already has a boyfriend.

  • GenreAdaptation, Drama, Romance
  • CastEmilia Clarke, Sam Claflin, Charles Dance, Vanessa Kirby.
  • DirectorThea Sharrock.
  • WriterJojo Moyes.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration110 mins
  • Official sitewww.mebeforeyoumovie.com
  • Release03/06/2016

Adapted from the bestselling novel by Jojo Moyes, Me Before You is a tear-stained romance about two lost souls, who find each other when they least expect it. The trajectory of this improbable love affair will be achingly familiar to anyone who has sobbed through The Fault In Our Eyes, Paper Towns and The Choice, and director Thea Sharrock clearly telegraphs each shameless tug of the heartstring. Moyes' screenplay adaptation omits some of the meatier content from her novel, like the heart-breaking reason her heroine is reluctant to leave home and explore the world. However, the crass depiction of class, which initially divides the characters, is still intact. Thus, the rich are carefree, fabulously attired and enjoy classical music and opera, while the working class are happily enslaved to denim and wouldn't know Brahms from Bartok. William Traynor (Sam Claflin) is a handsome high-flyer in London, who harks from privileged stock. His parents, Steven (Charles Dance) and Camilla (Janet McTeer), own a country pile including a crumbling castle and he jets off on expensive extreme sports holidays with his pretty girlfriend, Alicia (Vanessa Kirby). Fate deals William a cruel blow and he is left paralysed. He returns to his ancestral home and relinquishes his lust for life. In order to raise his spirits, the Traynors advertise for a companion for their son and misfit Louisa Clark (Emilia Clarke), who has just lost her job as a waitress at The Buttered Bun Cafe, answers the call. She lives in the nearby village with her unemployed father Bernard (Brendan Coyle), mother Josie (Samantha Spiro), sister Katrina (Jenna Coleman) and the rest of her extended family While hunky male nurse Nathan (Stephen Peacocke) tends to Will's physical needs, Louisa attempts to buoy his spirits with a series of excursions to the races and a classical music concert. An unlikely friendship threatens to blossom into romance, but Louisa already has a fitness-obsessed boyfriend, Patrick (Matthew Lewis). "You only get one life, Clark, and it's your responsibility to live it to the fullest," Will counsels Louisa, encouraging her to expand her horizons beyond the village and, indeed, Patrick. Me Before You glides serenely along its linear narrative. Fans of the book should snuffle through a couple of tissues as relationships unravel and good-looking cast members cry perfect tears in close-up. The morally complex issue of assisted suicide is broached in the most inoffensive and simplistic terms, offering one brief voice of dissent - "It's no better than murder!" - who is noticeably absent for the rest of the film. Despite the manifold failings of the script, luminous lead actors Clarke and Claflin kindle palpable sparks of on-screen chemistry that compel us to root for them, even when common sense tells us the relationship is destined to end in heartbreak.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Mother's Day 2 stars

Sandy is struggling to come to terms with the breakdown of her marriage and the news that her ex-husband has just married a younger woman. Meanwhile, Kristin refuses to marry her long term boyfriend Zack because she is haunted by the knowledge that she was adopted at birth. With encouragement from her best friend Jesse, who never sees her mother, Kristin decides to track down her birth parent and her detective work leads to successful writer Miranda.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastJulia Roberts, Kate Hudson, Jason Sudeikis, Timothy Olyphant, Jennifer Aniston.
  • DirectorGarry Marshall.
  • WriterTom Hines, Anya Kochoff Romano, Matt Walker.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration118 mins
  • Official sitewww.seemothersday.com
  • Release10/06/2016

Working to the same template as his films Valentine's Day and New Year's Eve, director Garry Marshall assembles a stellar cast for this sickly sweet comedy drama set in the run-up to Mother's Day. Jennifer Aniston, Kate Hudson, Julia Roberts and Jason Sudeikis vie for our wandering attention in four loosely intertwined narratives, which contemplate the enduring power of the maternal bond from different perspectives. Screenwriters Anya Kochoff Romano, Matt Walker and Tom Hines aren't content with signposting every predictable plot point in expository dialogue. They bludgeon us with superfluous detail. It's not enough for one character to tearfully confess that she was adopted. She has to crudely bullet point this touching moment of vulnerability with the brusque addendum: "I have abandonment issues." Thorny subjects of homophobia and racism are addressed with discomfiting glibness - "You got married to a towelhead?!" laments one father to his daughter after she introduces her Indian husband - and the all-consuming grief of losing a parent is salved with greetings card platitudes. Single mother Sandy Newhouse (Aniston) is stunned when her ex-husband Henry (Timothy Olyphant) confides he has just married his girlfriend Tina (Shay Mitchell). Since the Newhouses share custody of their boys, Sandy leaves Peter (Brandon Spink) and Mikey (Caleb Brown) with Henry while she processes his happy news. Nearby, widower Bradley Barton (Sudeikis) is haunted by the death of his soldier wife (Jennifer Garner). He pines for her memory and his reluctance to live in the present creates friction with daughters Rachel (Jessi Case) and Vicky (Ella Anderson). Meanwhile, Kristin (Britt Robertson) continues to rebuff marriage proposals from her stand-up comedian beau, Zack (Jack Whitehall), because she lacks a physical connection to her biological mother. With encouragement from her friend Jesse (Hudson), Kristin confronts her missing link - glamorous home shopping doyenne Miranda Collins (Roberts), whose day-to-day existence is closely managed by her agent, Lance (Hector Elizondo). As for Jesse and her lesbian sister Gabi (Sarah Chalke), they are hoarding plenty of secrets from their God-fearing Texan parents, Earl (Robert Pine) and Flo (Margo Martindale), who only leave home in a hulking RV. Mother's Day is a glossy waste of everyone's talents and our precious time. The script is saturated with saccharine emotion including a bizarre scene between Aniston and a children's party clown, who philosophises, "It's always the simple things that work... the bottomless love of a mother for her kids." Laughter is almost as hard to find as sincerity, even with the occasional in-joke such as Elizondo informing Roberts, "You're right, that IS the salad fork!" in a knowing wink to their iconic scene in Pretty Woman. In terms of future instalments, we should be grateful that other filmmakers have already staked claims to Independence Day, Halloween, Father's Day and Black Friday.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016

Royal Opera Live: Werther 3 stars

Joyce DiDonato and Vittorio Grigolo headline Benoit Jacquot's staging of Massenet's tragic love story, broadcast live from the Royal Opera House in London under the baton of conductor Antonio Pappano. Dutiful daughter Charlotte solemnly promises her mother on her deathbed that she will marry Albert. She carries through with the plan, denying rival suitor Werther a chance to woo her. They agree that separation will ease his pain and Werther agrees to travel but to keep in touch through his letters.

  • GenreDrama, Musical, Romance, Special
  • CastVittorio Grigolo, Joyce DiDonato, David Bizic, Heather Engebretson.
  • DirectorBenoit Jacquot.
  • WriterMassenet.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration190 mins
  • Official sitewww.roh.org.uk/cinemas
  • Release27/06/2016 (selected cinemas)

Joyce DiDonato and Vittorio Grigolo headline Benoit Jacquot's staging of Massenet's tragic love story, broadcast live from the Royal Opera House in London under the baton of conductor Antonio Pappano. Dutiful daughter Charlotte (DiDonato) solemnly promises her mother on her deathbed that she will marry Albert (David Bizic). She carries through with the plan, denying rival suitor Werther (Grigolo) a chance to woo her. They agree that separation will ease his pain and Werther agrees to travel but to keep in touch through his letters. Charlotte's marriage to Albert falls short of her expectations and she slowly falls in love with Werther through his correspondence. When Werther returns from his travels, Charlotte must make an agonising decision about where her future belongs.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016

This film is also showing at:

The Boss 3 stars

Businesswoman Michelle Darnell becomes America's 47th richest woman until her dubious ethics result in a five-year prison sentence for insider trading. She emerges without any friends to greet her. In desperation, Michelle takes up temporary residence on a temperamental sofa bed belonging to her former personal assistant, Claire. From this low-rent headquarters, Michelle doggedly resolves to rebuild her empire by creating a flourishing chocolate brownie business from Claire's moreish secret recipe.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastPeter Dinklage, Kristen Bell, Melissa McCarthy, Tyler Labine, Ella Anderson, Kathy Bates.
  • DirectorBen Falcone.
  • WriterBen Falcone, Melissa McCarthy.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration99 mins
  • Official site
  • Release10/06/2016

What a difference two years makes. In the summer of 2014, actress Melissa McCarthy and husband Ben Falcone ended her winning streak of hilarious big-screen comedies with the misfiring road movie Tammy, which they co-wrote and he directed. Love and marriage didn't come together in a script packed with belly laughs. Unperturbed by Tammy's critical mauling, McCarthy and Falcone rekindle their unholy alliance in front of and behind the camera for this brash comedy about an egocentric businesswoman, who is forced to rebuild her life after a stint behind bars. The Boss improves on its predecessor in one crucial respect: it is sporadically funny and the ebullient leading lady strains every sinew in her single-minded quest to milk laughs from pratfalls. A throwaway visual gag of a mouthguard is silly enough to induce snorts of derision, while a scene of sisterly bonding over what to wear to a first date showcases McCarthy's gift for physical humour (at the expense of her co-star's blushes). However, husband and wife haven't learnt from past transgressions. They haven't invested enough time in fully realising the characters, some gags lack punchlines, and in the closing act, they risk a hostile takeover from mawkish sentiment. Michelle Darnell (McCarthy) was raised at the Blessed Sisters Of Mercy orphanage, where efforts to find the youngster a loving, adopted family ended in crushing disappointment. Emboldened by her humiliating ordeal, Michelle becomes America's 47th richest woman until her dubious ethics result in a five-year prison sentence for insider trading. She emerges without any friends to greet her. Her bodyguard Tito (Cedric Yarbrough) has abandoned her and long-suffering personal assistant Claire Rawlings (Kristen Bell) has a young daughter Rachel (Ella Anderson) to nurture. In desperation, Michelle turns up unannounced on Claire's doorstep and takes up temporary residence on a temperamental sofa bed. From this low-rent headquarters, Michelle doggedly resolves to rebuild her empire by creating a flourishing chocolate brownie business from Claire's moreish secret recipe. Moderate success brings the shamed business mogul back into contact with her aggrieved rival, Renault (Peter Dinklage), and former mentor Ida Marquette (Kathy Bates). Meanwhile, single mother Claire nervously prepares for a date with nice guy Mike (Tyler Labine). The Boss is a pleasant, fleeting diversion that fulfils the most basic requirement of a comedy: it makes you laugh. McCarthy barrels through every frame with gusto and Bell dutifully plays the straight woman caught in the eye of the tornado. True, some of the giggles are inelegant and hard won but it's a vast improvement over the tumbleweed of Tammy. Effort exceeds reward throughout Falcone's film, but on the few occasions the script, performances and direction align, it is genuinely funny and sweet.

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Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016

The Conjuring 2 3 stars

Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine have gone into self-imposed exile to recover - emotionally and spiritually - from their first brush with malevolent spirits. They are compelled to return to active duty by terrified single mother Peggy Hodgson, who claims that her house in north London is in the grip of a dark, invisible force. The Warrens travel to England and meet Peggy and her four daughters, who are clearly spooked by events in their home.

  • GenreHistorical/Period, Horror, Thriller
  • CastPatrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga, Madison Wolfe, Simon McBurney, Frances O'Connor.
  • DirectorJames Wan.
  • WriterChad Hayes, Carey Hayes, James Wan, David Johnson.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration134 mins
  • Official sitewww.theconjuring2.com
  • Release13/06/2016

Fact and outlandish fiction are repeatedly smudged in James Wan's stylish sequel to his 2013 supernatural horror, which dramatised one of the real-life cases of paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren. Like its predecessor, The Conjuring 2 juxtaposes archive photographs and the Warrens' taped interviews over the end credits to convince us that the spooky shenanigans orchestrated on screen are anchored in unsettling reality. Only the gullible would submit wholeheartedly to the film's gargantuan suspensions of belief. Subtlety often eludes Wan, like a blast on the soundtrack of London Calling by The Clash when the storyline moves to the capital, and he's rather fond of shooting impending doom from the point of view of an evil spirit creeping up on its victim. Artistic flourishes aside, the sequel draws inspiration from the notorious case of the Enfield poltergeist, which sent shivers down the spines of north Londoners in the late 1970s. To this day, the veracity of the haunting is shrouded in mystery. However, the four screenwriters of The Conjuring 2 are content to use one family's terror as a foundation for the usual array of horror tropes: creaking floorboards, a child speaking in tongues, inverted crosses, and ghostly figures emerging from the darkness. In 1976, Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga) visit the Amityville house where Ronald DeFeo Jr was convicted of killing six members of his family. "This is as close to Hell as I ever want to get," sobs Lorraine after she enters a trance to relive the tragic night. The Warrens go into self-imposed exile to devote more time to their teenage daughter, Judy (Sterling Jerins). The church compels the Warrens to return to active service to investigate claims from a terrified single mother, Peggy Hodgson (Frances O'Connor), that her house in Enfield is in the grip of a dark force. Ed and Lorraine travel to rain-swept England to interview Peggy and her four children, Margaret (Lauren Esposito), Janet (Madison Wolfe), Billy (Benjamin Haigh) and Johnny (Patrick McAuley). When youngest daughter Janet exhibits signs of demonic possession, Ed and Lorraine battle with the lingering phantom of an old man (Bob Adrian) for the Hodgsons' souls. The Conjuring 2 feels overlong and lacks the tight emotional bond of the first film's besieged family. Wilson and Farmiga ease back into familiar roles while youngster Wolfe is impressive, including one unsettling scene of her character shuddering with fear beneath bedsheets as a spirit hovers above her. The script dissipates tension with occasional flecks of deadpan humour, like when two police constables witness a chair moving on its own around the Hodgson home and a WPC remarks, "This is a bit beyond us." It's certainly not beyond audiences, who enjoy gentle jump-out-of-their-seat scares as they nervously bite nails in the dark of a cinema.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

The Importance Of Being Earnest: Encore Screening 3 stars

David Suchet purses his lips and heaves his bosom as the indomitable Lady Bracknell in this recording of a live performance of Oscar Wilde's razor-sharp satire on Victorian manners on the stage of the Vaudeville Theatre in London's West End. Subtitled A Trivial Comedy For Serious People, the story centres on bachelor best friends Algernon Moncrieff and John Worthing, who adopt different identities as they swan between dual lives in the city and country. The elaborate ruse has unforeseen consequences.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance, Special
  • CastDavid Suchet, Michael Benz, Philip Cumbus, Emily Barber, Imogen Doel.
  • DirectorAdrian Noble.
  • WriterOscar Wilde.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration149 mins
  • Official sitewww.importanceofearnest.com

David Suchet purses his lips and heaves his bosom as the indomitable Lady Bracknell in this recording of a live performance of Oscar Wilde's razor-sharp satire on Victorian manners on the stage of the Vaudeville Theatre in London's West End. Subtitled A Trivial Comedy For Serious People, the story centres on bachelor best friends Algernon Moncrieff (Philip Cumbus) and John Worthing (Michael Benz) who adopt different identities as they swan between dual lives in the city and country. The ruse becomes hilariously complicated when the men court Cecily Cardew (Imogen Doel) and Gwendolen Fairfax (Emily Barber) respectively. One little white lies stacks upon another as Algernon and John attempt to win the hearts of the women, while fending off questions from Gwendolen's formidable mother, Lady Bracknell. Directed by Adrian Noble, the performance is enhanced with additional backstage footage and cast interviews, which are exclusive to this cinema event.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 29th June 2016

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The Nice Guys 4 stars

Jackson Healy is a hired heavy in 1977 Los Angeles, who beats up perverts and stalkers with his knuckleduster. A young woman called Amelia Kuttner pays him to scare off low-rent private detective Holland March, who has been asking for her around town. The first meeting of these two men ends in bloodshed and broken bones, but Jackson and Holland reluctantly agree to work together when Amelia subsequently vanishes without trace.

Good things come to those who wait. Every decade, filmmaker Shane Black unspools a deliciously off-kilter buddy action comedy that plays fast and loose with the conventions of the genre. In 1996, he penned The Long Kiss Goodnight starring Geena Davis and Samuel L Jackson, which metamorphosed a picture-perfect suburban mom into a finely honed killing machine. In 2005, he repeated the feat and also sat in the director's chair for the potty-mouthed murder mystery Kiss Kiss Bang Bang headlining Robert Downey Jr and Val Kilmer. Now, Black strikes it lucky for a third time with the unlikely comic pairing of Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling in The Nice Guys, a hare-brained missing person's caper set in sexually liberated 1977 Los Angeles. The script delivers big, throaty laughs from the cynical opening - "Marriage is buying a house with someone you hate!" - and adroitly juggles physical and verbal humour, inflicting injuries and indignities on his leading men for our sport and entertainment. It's a groovy kind of bromantic love and Crowe and Gosling relish the to and fro of the snappy dialogue as they gleefully contend with the fashions of the era. Jackson Healy (Crowe) is a hired heavy, who beats up perverts and stalkers with his knuckleduster. A young woman called Amelia Kuttner (Margaret Qualley) pays him to scare off low-rent private detective Holland March (Gosling), who has been asking for her around town. The first meeting of these two men ends in bloodshed and broken bones, but Jackson and Holland reluctantly agree to work together when Amelia subsequently vanishes without trace. "Why don't you invite him in?" asks Holland's precocious daughter Holly (Angourie Rice) when Jackson turns up at their door. "No animals in the house, sweetheart," retorts the investigator, bearing the physical scars of their previous encounter. The breadcrumb trail of evidence leads to Amelia's fearsome mother, Judith Kuttner (Kim Basinger), who works for the United States Department of Justice and pleads with Jackson and Holland to locate and protect her child. Unfortunately, a hitman called John Boy (Matt Bomer) is also on the trail of Amelia, and Holland also needs to solve the perplexing mystery of porn actress Misty Mountains (Murielle Telio), who was apparently seen alive two days after she died in a car accident. The Nice Guys doesn't quite soar to the dizzy heights of Black's previous escapades, but he comes close, retaining an enviable ability to conjure jaw-dropping one-liners out of nowhere. Like when the central duo is detained by a police officer who is simply following the rulebook. "You know who else was just following orders? Hitler!" counters Jackson. The central plot is a morass of crosses, double crosses, bluffs and coincidences that intrigues and bamboozles, untangling itself in the closing frames with aplomb.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

The Secret Life Of Pets 3 stars

Katie shares her Manhattan apartment with a terrier named Max, who relishes the close relationship with his owner. This special bond is threatened when Katie brings home a mongrel named Duke, who she has saved from a grim fate at the local dog pound. The two pooches are forced to put their rivalry to one side when a gang of abandoned pets led by a white rabbit named Snowball launches an intense campaign of revenge against contended owners and their pets.

  • GenreAnimation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastLake Bell, Jenny Slate, Ellie Kemper, Tara Strong, Louis CK, Albert Brooks, Kevin Hart.
  • DirectorChris Renaud, Yarrow Cheney.
  • WriterKen Daurio, Brian Lynch, Cinco Paul.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration91 mins
  • Official sitewww.thesecretlifeofpets.co.uk
  • Release24/06/2016

Creatures great and small wreak havoc on the streets of New York City in Chris Renaud and Yarrow Cheney's colourful computer-animated romp. Employing a similar framework to Toy Story, The Secret Life Of Pets imagines what our four-legged, feathered and finned friends get up to when our backs are turned, suggesting that the fun begins when we go to work or school. A Jack Russell terrier and an affection starved mongrel replace Woody and Buzz Lightyear as the feuding central characters, whose rivalry mellows into mutual affection when they are separated from their owner. Screenwriters Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch and Cinco Paul have great fun in early scenes, revealing how a dachshund uses his owner's food mixer as a back massager or one tiny dog performs acrobatic leaps to water a hanging basket with a cock of its leg. The central concept isn't original but there's an infectious charm to every shiny frame of Renaud and Cheney's well-groomed picture, which mercilessly exploits our affection for the critters that share our homes. Katie (voiced by Ellie Kemper) lives in her Manhattan apartment with a mischievous terrier named Max (Louis CK). "Our love is stronger than words or shoes," explains Max, referring to his penchant for chewing his owner's footwear when he was a puppy in training. He is good friends with other domesticated animals and birds including a pampered Eskimo dog named Gidget (Jenny Slate), who is head over fluffy tail in love with Max, and a sardonic house cat named Chloe (Lake Bell), who nurtures a healthy disdain for anything that doesn't enrich her selfish existence. "Dog people do weird, inexplicable things," she purrs, "like they get dogs instead of cats." Max's bond with Katie is threatened when his owner brings home a lolloping mongrel named Duke (Eric Stonestreet), who she has saved from the pound. Intense rivalry spills out onto the city streets where Max and Duke fall foul of a Sphynx cat called Ozone (Steve Coogan) and are mistaken for strays by animal control officers. The snarling enemies are rescued by a maniacal white rabbit named Snowball (Kevin Hart), who pressgangs them into service in his army of unwanted animals, who live in the sewers. The Secret Life Of Pets is the brainchild of the makers of Despicable Me and Minions, and retains a similar visual style and family-friendly sense of humour. Behavioural tics of each breed are mercilessly exploited for slapstick laughs and co-directors Renaud and Cheney maintain a brisk trot to ensure young audiences don't go for walkies in the middle of the film. The main feature is accompanied by a cute animated short entitled Mower Minions in which the gibberish-spouting sidekicks tend the lawn of elderly neighbours. Alas, the diminutive do-gooders are yellow fingers and thumbs, propagating plentiful guffaws and giggles.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

The Secret Life Of Pets 3D 3 stars

Katie shares her Manhattan apartment with a terrier named Max, who relishes the close relationship with his owner. This special bond is threatened when Katie brings home a mongrel named Duke, who she has saved from a grim fate at the local dog pound. The two pooches are forced to put their rivalry to one side when a gang of abandoned pets led by a white rabbit named Snowball launches an intense campaign of revenge against contended owners and their pets.

  • GenreAnimation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastTara Strong, Lake Bell, Jenny Slate, Louis CK, Ellie Kemper, Albert Brooks, Kevin Hart.
  • DirectorChris Renaud, Yarrow Cheney.
  • WriterCinco Paul, Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration91 mins
  • Official sitewww.thesecretlifeofpets.co.uk
  • Release24/06/2016

Creatures great and small wreak havoc on the streets of New York City in Chris Renaud and Yarrow Cheney's colourful computer-animated romp. Employing a similar framework to Toy Story, The Secret Life Of Pets imagines what our four-legged, feathered and finned friends get up to when our backs are turned, suggesting that the fun begins when we go to work or school. A Jack Russell terrier and an affection starved mongrel replace Woody and Buzz Lightyear as the feuding central characters, whose rivalry mellows into mutual affection when they are separated from their owner. Screenwriters Ken Daurio, Brian Lynch and Cinco Paul have great fun in early scenes, revealing how a dachshund uses his owner's food mixer as a back massager or one tiny dog performs acrobatic leaps to water a hanging basket with a cock of its leg. The central concept isn't original but there's an infectious charm to every shiny frame of Renaud and Cheney's well-groomed picture, which mercilessly exploits our affection for the critters that share our homes. Katie (voiced by Ellie Kemper) lives in her Manhattan apartment with a mischievous terrier named Max (Louis CK). "Our love is stronger than words or shoes," explains Max, referring to his penchant for chewing his owner's footwear when he was a puppy in training. He is good friends with other domesticated animals and birds including a pampered Eskimo dog named Gidget (Jenny Slate), who is head over fluffy tail in love with Max, and a sardonic house cat named Chloe (Lake Bell), who nurtures a healthy disdain for anything that doesn't enrich her selfish existence. "Dog people do weird, inexplicable things," she purrs, "like they get dogs instead of cats." Max's bond with Katie is threatened when his owner brings home a lolloping mongrel named Duke (Eric Stonestreet), who she has saved from the pound. Intense rivalry spills out onto the city streets where Max and Duke fall foul of a Sphynx cat called Ozone (Steve Coogan) and are mistaken for strays by animal control officers. The snarling enemies are rescued by a maniacal white rabbit named Snowball (Kevin Hart), who pressgangs them into service in his army of unwanted animals, who live in the sewers. The Secret Life Of Pets is the brainchild of the makers of Despicable Me and Minions, and retains a similar visual style and family-friendly sense of humour. Behavioural tics of each breed are mercilessly exploited for slapstick laughs and co-directors Renaud and Cheney maintain a brisk trot to ensure young audiences don't go for walkies in the middle of the film. The main feature is accompanied by a cute animated short entitled Mower Minions in which the gibberish-spouting sidekicks tend the lawn of elderly neighbours. Alas, the diminutive do-gooders are yellow fingers and thumbs, propagating plentiful guffaws and giggles.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 27th June 2016
Tuesday 28th June 2016
Wednesday 29th June 2016
Thursday 30th June 2016

Warcraft: The Beginning 2 stars

Peace in the magical realm of Azeroth is shattered when a portal opens to the dying world of Draenor. Orc chieftain Durotan leads his endangered clan, including his wife Draka and son Thrall, through the portal in search for a new place to call home. Unfortunately, the presence of orcs in Azeroth poses a threat to the human population led by King Llane Wrynn and his wife Lady Taria. Battle lines are drawn and half-human half-orc Garona Halforcen is torn between the two factions.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Fantasy
  • CastPaula Patton, Toby Kebbell, Travis Fimmel, Ben Foster, Dominic Cooper.
  • DirectorDuncan Jones.
  • WriterDuncan Jones, Charles Leavitt.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration123 mins
  • Official sitewww.warcraft-movie.co.uk
  • Release30/05/2016

The power of the human imagination is limitless. I fondly recall happy hours as a child immersed in Dungeons & Dragons role-playing games with my friends: the pressures of homework or bullying at school melted away as we embarked on valiant quests to slay fierce beasts, rescue damsels in distress and cast magical spells to defeat powerful adversaries. In the digital age, there's no need to huddle in a room with pens and paper, throwing numbered die to decide the fates of plucky adventurers. Complex online role playing games bring together strangers from around the globe in real time to play out protracted battles in vast virtual realms. The subscription-based Warcraft series is among the most popular, spawning an entire franchise that has now given birth to this muscular, special effects-heavy blockbuster directed by Duncan Jones. Spectacle trumps characterisation and coherent plotting in every digitally altered frame of Warcraft: The Beginning, which casually begs, borrows and steals from Avatar, The Lord Of The Rings and numerous fantasy adventures to plunge us head-first into a war between humans and hulking beasts called orcs. Peace in the kingdom of Azeroth is shattered when a portal opens to the dying world of Draenor. Orc chieftain Gul'dan (Daniel Wu), who has been consumed by a dark magic called The Fell, gatecrashes Azeroth with his warmongering clans and begins to slaughter everyone who stands in his way. One tribal chief, Durotan (Toby Kebbell), does not share Gul'dan's bloodlust and prepares to stage a coup that could endanger his wife Draka (Anna Galvin) and infant son Thrall. Meanwhile, King Llane Wrynn (Dominic Cooper) and his wife Lady Taria (Ruth Negga), who preside over Azeroth, summon the kingdom's guardian, a sorcerer called Medivh (Ben Foster), who dwells in an enchanted tower with his trusty manservant Blackhand (Clancy Brown). The magician pledges to stand beside the King's men in battle, including noble swordsman Sir Anduin Lothar (Travis Fimmel) and his son Callan (Burkely Duffield), and a trainee mage called Khadgar (Ben Schnetzer). During their first clash with the orcs, The King's soldiers capture a half-human half-orc slave called Garona Halforcen (Paula Patton). She turns out to be a valuable ally in a titanic battle for the control of Azeroth. Despite all of the adrenaline-fuelled action sequences and frenetic editing, Warcraft: The Beginning is a bore. The script makes no allowances to newcomers to this world of magic and mayhem, providing only the flimsiest back stories for two-dimensional characters. Motion-capture performances bring to life these otherworldly denizens with considerable technological sound and fury. Behind all of the CGI, there's very little to make the heart beat faster or minds race. Intentional humour is in perilously short supply and three romantic subplots lack on-screen sizzle, undermining the emotional impact of climatic scenes that clearly set up a sequel.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 28th June 2016